Connecticut Auction Law

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the United States’ New England area. According to the 2010 Census, it has the greatest per-capita income, the second-highest level of human development (after Massachusetts), and the highest median family income in the country. It is bounded to the east by Rhode Island, to the north by Massachusetts, to the west by New York, and to the south by the Long Island Sound. Hartford is the state capital, while Bridgeport is the most populated city. Historically, the state has been a part of New England as well as the tri-state territory that includes New York and New Jersey, which together form metropolitan New York City.The Connecticut River, which roughly bisects the state, inspired the state’s name. The name “Connecticut” is derived from different anglicized versions of “Quononoquett (Conanicut),” a Mohegan-Pequot word that means “long tidal river.”

The earliest European inhabitants in Connecticut were Dutchmen who constructed Fort Hoop in Hartford at the junction of the Park and Connecticut Rivers.

AUCTIONS AND AUCTIONEERS

Sec. 8-1. – Scope of chapter.

The provisions of this chapter shall not apply to any auction held under the direction of any executor or administrator in the process of settling his decedent’s estate, or to an auction held pursuant to any court order.

Sec. 8-2. – Fee for license generally.

All persons licensed by the bureau of licenses and inspections with the approval of the city manager, to sell at auction under the provisions of the General Statutes, shall pay therefor a license fee of five dollars ($5.00) a day for the period covered by such license.

Sec. 8-3. – Fee for license for jewelry auctioneers.

All persons licensed by the state commissioner of consumer protection to sell jewelry at auction under the provisions of the General Statutes shall, in addition to such license, secure a license from the bureau of licenses and inspections, approved by the city manager, to sell such jewelry at auction, and shall pay therefor a license fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) a day for the period covered by the license.

Sec. 8-4. – Qualifications for jewelry auctioneers.

No auctioneer shall hold an auction for any person in the jewelry business unless such person has been in business continuously in the city at the same location at which the auction is to be held for a period of one (1) year immediately preceding such auction, or conduct any auction for a person who has sold watches, diamonds, jewelry, sterling silverware, clocks or any other goods commonly sold by jewelers at auction in the city for an aggregate period of thirty (30) days during a period of one (1) year immediately preceding such contemplated auction.

Sec. 8-5. – Hours for sales of jewelry.

No person shall sell, offer for sale, or dispose of jewelry, watches, diamonds, sterling silverware, clocks or any other goods commonly sold by jewelers, at public auction in the city prior to 8:00 a.m. or after 6:00 p.m. of any day, except where the state commissioner of consumer protection has extended the hours of sale for a particular licensee to 11:00 p.m.

Sec. 8-6. – Duration of sale.

No auctioneer shall conduct any auction sale for more than thirty (30) days from the date of beginning of such sale.

Sec. 8-7. – False representations by auctioneers.

No auctioneer shall make any false representations as to the type, quality, condition, value or present or previous ownership of any watches, diamonds, jewelry, sterling silverware, clocks or any other goods commonly sold by jewelers which are offered for sale by him, or substitute another article for any article sold by him.

Sec. 8-8. – Mock bids.

No person shall act as an accomplice for the purpose of making mock bids at any auction sale.

SALE BY AUCTION

(1)  In a sale by auction if goods are put up in lots each lot is the subject of a separate sale.

(2) A sale by auction is complete when the auctioneer so announces by the fall of the hammer or in other customary manner. Where a bid is made while the hammer is falling in acceptance of a prior bid the auctioneer may in his discretion reopen the bidding or declare the goods sold under the bid on which the hammer was falling.

(3) Such a sale is with reserve unless the goods are in explicit terms put up without reserve. In an auction with reserve the auctioneer may withdraw the goods at any time until he announces completion of the sale. In an auction without reserve, after the auctioneer calls for bids on an article or lot, that article or lot cannot be withdrawn unless no bid is made within a reasonable time. In either case a bidder may retract his bid until the auctioneer’s announcement of completion of the sale, but a bidder’s retraction does not revive any previous bid.

(4) If the auctioneer knowingly receives a bid on the seller’s behalf or the seller makes or procures such a bid, and notice has not been given that liberty for such bidding is reserved, the buyer may at his option avoid the sale or take the goods at the price of the last good faith bid prior to the completion of the sale. This subsection shall not apply to any bid at a forced sale.

Penalty for Selling at Auction Without License – Connecticut

Each person who exposes for sale by auction any goods or articles, except provisions, charcoal, wood, the products of a farm and second hand household furniture, in any town, city or borough of which he is not a resident, without a license therefor from a majority of the selectmen of such town or from the authorities of such city or borough authorized by the charter or ordinances of such city or borough to issue such license, shall be fined not more than two hundred fifty dollars. This section shall not apply to any auction conducted by or contracted for the state in accordance with any court order under the provisions of section 54-36b or 54-36c.

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